Monday, December 29, 2014

Goals

As we approach the New Year, we often reflect upon the past one, looking for habits, thought processes, traditions, etc., upon which we might improve. If you have suffered a significant loss over the past year, you may not be looking forward to the New Year nor its festivities. You may not think the New Year holds anything for your life without your loved one by your side.

It is normal for grief to preoccupy our minds for quite some time after the loss of a loved one. Our lives and thoughts are disorganized; we must learn new skills and reorganize our thoughts, our lives and ourselves.

In addition to parties, tradition dictates that one thoughtfully set New Year’s resolutions. Resolutions are goals we set to improve our lives. Improving our lives is the very same goal of grief recovery. In both circumstances, one may not wish to change. One may feel extreme pressure or great fear when faced with new behaviors, new challenges, and new experiences. We may not be ready nor strong enough for change.

The choice is yours alone.  Just as we choose to redirect our habits to improve our physical health, perhaps by eating healthier foods or adding more aerobic opportunities daily; we can choose to improve our bereavement health.

Grief is brought on by broken attachments, and although we do not wish to erase our loved one from our lives, we do eventually choose to adjust the attachment they maintain in our hearts.  To recover from grief, one must move the decedent from a living companion to a loving memory.  Doing so protects and preserves the relationship shared with your loved one, yet allows recovery from the excruciating pain of their absence.  The time and efforts invested into your lost loved one may now be focused on other loved ones and new activities.

The New Year is a good time to evaluate where you are in your grief recovery process.  If you feel you are ready to add activities and outings to your life, formulate a plan that fits your strength and abilities.  You may feel ready to begin your transition beginning January 1st.  It may be that you set a goal to work up to venturing out to your favorite activities beginning in March or even September.  The point is that you are the authority on how you feel and when you are ready to increase your physical activities, your emotional acuity, and your social exposure.

My name is Tracy Renee Lee.  I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I am the American Funeral Director of the Year Runner-Up and recipient of the BBB’s Integrity Award.  I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences on their "Road to Recovery". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.

Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement, information or booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

Monday, December 22, 2014

Sadness is Temporary, Love is Eternal

People die every day of the year, but if your loved one has died on, or just before a holiday, that holiday has forever changed. Unfortunately, as the years progress, your friends will forget, or not know, that your loved one died on a particular holiday. Through no fault of your own, this can make holiday cheer intolerable. It is important for you to realize and prepare yourself for this experience.
Do not feel insecure or shy over notifying your friends that the upcoming holiday will carry sadness and loneliness for you. Understanding that you may need to limit your exposure to parties, as well as other events, allows you to manage your exposure to your tolerance level, and allows your friends to understand what is happening. There is nothing wrong in doing this.
As time progresses, so too will your ability to tolerate social activities. The pain of losing your loved one, will one day transfer into fond and loving memories. Once you cross this threshold, you will find you are again able to tolerate events with a modicum of comfort and joy. Until that day, forewarning your friends, will offer them opportunities to reach out and help you move through the holiday with support and exposure levels that are comfortable for you.
If you have suffered holiday loss, I extend my deepest condolences. The pain you feel at the loss of your loved one is brought on through the love you shared with them. Love is the most powerful emotion known to mankind. Because of its depth and power, it transcends all other emotions. The love in your heart is stronger than your sadness. This weaker emotion will one day make way, allowing more powerful memories of love and happiness to replace it.
Sadness is temporary, but love is eternal.
My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I am the American Funeral Director of the Year Runner-Up and recipient of the BBB’s Integrity Award. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences in their "Pursuit of Excellence". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement, information or booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

Monday, December 15, 2014

Absence of Christmas Joy

The Christmas holidays are a wonderful time of year, rich with tradition and family gatherings. Loss, however, can quickly change Christmas in the hearts of those who suffer its sting, from merry and bright to dark and dreary. Christmas losses are some of the most difficult from which to recover, however; to lose a child is particularly harrowing during this time of year.
I was at the theater today when my daughter called and asked me questions about infant caskets. I asked her why she wanted the information, and she informed me that a family in her church had lost their infant today. Her heart was heavy, and she was near tears, as she asked me questions on behalf of this unfortunate family.
The loss of an infant is always a very difficult and sad experience. At this time of year, however, when all is joyous, the juxtaposition of grief creates a stark reality, which can very easily become quite complicated.
I attended a Christmas luncheon this week with a dear friend. The guest speaker gave a wonderful presentation on the gift of the Savior’s birth. Although this family is a religious family, hearing others say that their baby is with Jesus will bring them little comfort this holiday season. Cheerfully wrapped baby gifts in brightly colored Christmas paper, will now remain unopened and eventually have to be returned. This experience is, and will continue to be, dreadful for this sweet couple. Most likely, this young mother and father will suffer the depths of their sorrows every Christmas from this one forward.
My daughter has another friend who some years back, lost a child during the holidays. This family places their beloved child’s empty shoes just outside of his bedroom door each Christmas to mark their love for him and continued sorrow over his loss. Although this may seem a painful reminder to those of us who have not lost a child during the holiday season, it is actually an act of healing. Creating new traditions to memorialize a significant loss helps one create a place from which to honor their loved one and allows them to participate in holiday activities without trivializing their loss and heartache.
Friends will want to know what to say to this poor couple who lost their baby earlier today. They will want to know if it is still appropriate to wish them a Merry Christmas or give them gifts that have already been purchased. Some will worry about the effects of Christmas cards already in the mail or parties already planned.
The luncheon speaker said the greatest gift one can give another during difficult times, is not a casserole or a clever card for cheer. “The greatest gift,” she said, “one can give another during the most dreadful experience of life, is prayer.” Supplicating to the Father on behalf of another’s sorrow, for their comfort and recovery, is perhaps the kindest and most significant gift one human being can give another. After all, was not Christ’s supplication to his Father on our behalf, one of his greatest gifts to mankind?
The Christmas holidays are a wonderful time of year, rich with tradition and family gatherings. My heart bleeds for these two families who have suffered such profound losses. Tonight when my family kneels in prayer at the close of our day, we will offer a prayer for these and all other families suffering the poignant experience of loss during their absence of Christmas joy. I hope you will too.
My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I am the American Funeral Director of the Year Runner-Up and recipient of the BBB’s Integrity Award. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences in their "Pursuit of Excellence". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement, information or booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

Monday, December 8, 2014

Angel of Mercy


Do you have a friend who is angelic and sometimes wish you could be more like her?  I have a friend like that. Her name is Wendy.
Wendy and I have been friends for more than twenty years. Most of those years have been geographically long distanced, but our friendship remains steadfast. Both of our husbands worked for governmental agencies that do not consider relocation of duty stations as disruptive for families. So, her family has gone one way and mine has gone another.
Wendy is so amazingly unique that once she has touched your life, your heart never forgets nor lets go of the new cheer she has brought. Knowing her changes your outlook on life and permanently lifts your spirits. She is kind, talented, funny, concerned, generous and possess many additional graces, too vast to list.
The past several years have been difficult for Wendy. Her health has suffered tremendously; her children have all gone off to college and careers, and most recently she has nursed two very close relatives, her dad and her aunt, through the end of life.
I don't know how she did it. Her father died nearly two months ago. She was there, day in and day out, helping him through his weakest moments until he drew his last breath. She left her home; her family and her employment to bring him the comfort and support he needed to leave his life behind. She gave up so much, and he gave up everything.
As soon as her dad's services were accomplished, Wendy rushed back to her dear aunt's bedside. She had transferred back and forth between multiple states caring for her dad and her aunt as they both suffered end of life ailments for nearly two years. I don't know where her strength came from. Now that her dad was gone, without taking a few days off for herself, this angel of mercy immediately dove back into total care for her aunt, three states away.
Her aunt died last week, and now, Wendy is traveling back to her home, another three states away. Her journey has been temporarily disrupted due to heavy snowfall in the northern United States. I emailed her yesterday, asking for help with an issue that requires her particular talent and skill set. I expected her to write back that she would get to it after a month or two of personal recovery.
Not at all. My dear friend Wendy, who has not been home for nearly two years, has nursed two close family members through their deaths, has suffered severe health issues and is returning home to an empty house (if she can get through a snow covered state), wrote back that she is searching for a computer to borrow so that she can accomplish my request. Now that is an amazing woman, an amazing friend, an amazing daughter and an amazing niece.
I do not know what this next year holds for my dear friend Wendy. She has suffered extreme loss. She will grieve the compounded losses of her father and aunt. She will grieve the emptiness of her home without her children. She will grieve the loss of her better health, and she will grieve the loss of her employment. One thing she will not grieve is the love and admiration of her appreciative and devoted friend. I hope that I can help her through her grief recovery. I hope she can rely on me in her moments of despair and rock bottom loneliness. I hope I will be able to be a source of recovery for her.
Do you have a friend who is angelic and sometimes wish you could be more like her?  I hope my dear friend Wendy has a friend like that. I hope her name is Tracy.
My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences to "Make Life Right". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement, information or booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

Monday, December 1, 2014

Body Donation

I am often asked by families with a recently or nearly deceased loved one, “Is body donation a viable option?” As a funeral director, I have researched body donation extensively as this subject was never broached in my field of study, at college. If one is considering body donation, there are many facts of which one must be aware.
Body donation is not a simple process that may be accomplished within a day or two. Body donation requires advanced preparation and has extensive restrictions. If you are considering body donation, I suggest you take the necessary steps toward its accomplishment at least one year, or more, before you anticipate its need. The majority of medical institutions, accepting body donations, necessitate all documents and requirements are acceptably completed six months prior to death.
In most cases, the decedent MUST be less than 6’4” in height. Males must weigh less than 200 lbs yet more than 120 lbs. Females must weigh less than 180 lbs yet more than 100 lbs. Decedents must also receive a unique embalming procedure within six to eight hours of death. He or she must have died within 100 miles of the accepting medical institution and arrive there within three days of death.
Likewise, the decedent MUST NOT be autopsied; an organ donor (exception; eyeballs only) nor have any unhealed surgery. Infectious diseases such as HIV, Hepatitis, Syphilis, MRSA or Sepsis, contagious diseases, viral diseases or jaundice also render one unacceptable. One may not have been in medical isolation, nor have bodily injuries such as those commonly sustained from an automobile accident, suicide or invasive surgery. Decomposition, open wounds, ulcerations or bedsores also render one unsuitable. One may not be obese, emaciated nor have contractures. Ruptured aneurysm or malignancies spread to adjacent organs are also conditions for disqualification. (UTHS, DUSM, LSU)
In addition, bodies with opposing next of kin or presented by next of kin are rarely accepted. Acceptance into the program does not guarantee acceptance upon death. Institutions reserve the right to refuse or reject bodies at any time. If one previously has met the qualifications for donation, yet sustained condition changes during the process of dying, one may no longer meet the acceptable condition criteria for body donation. Additionally, if the institution has sufficient inventory, the cadaver will be rejected at time of death.
Cadaver usefulness usually expires six months to three years after research has begun. In most cases, one’s family may receive one’s cremains if requested. Due to the uniqueness of medical research embalming requirements, one’s person is generally unrecognizable. This procedure protects the anonymity of the cadaver.
Body donation is a worthwhile gift of oneself to humanity; however, if one has chosen and been accepted into the program, one should consider and financially prepare for alternative plans as well. In so doing, one may pass in peace, knowing that in any scenario, one’s family will not be burdened with unanticipated financial crisis.
My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences to "Make Life Right". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement, information or booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

VA Burial Benefits

Quite often, I serve a family who has lost a veteran and sincerely believes they are entitled to some wonderful (non-existing) burial funds from the US government. While it is true, the government has funds set aside for Veteran’s death benefits, it has been my experience that almost no one ever qualifies for them.
Presently, I have a veteran in my embalming room who will be buried this weekend. Unfortunately, he did not prepare financially for his death. He, like his family, believed that he qualified for plenty of money to cover his final expenses through his military service. In reality, if his family ever sees a cent from the government, I will be very pleasantly surprised.
It has long been my opinion that the government intentionally writes information to confuse the average American citizen. For this reason, I will attempt to explain the necessary qualifications your veteran MUST meet for governmental funding to cover his or her final expenses and the benefits for which he or she MIGHT qualify.
While reading this article, please note that the government "MIGHT" (which means maybe or maybe not) pay benefits for your veteran, while your veteran "MUST" (which means shall or is obliged to) meet the requirements as set forth through the VA. Before we begin, however, I want to tell you exactly what I tell my mother almost daily.
“The government does not establish requirements to qualify you for aid; they establish restrictions in order to disqualify you. If the government, an attorney or an insurance company is asking you a question, understand that they are trying to find information to disqualify you from any funds for which you are asking, or in which you stand in need.”
So, what are these burial benefits, and how is a veteran not disqualified from them?
REQUIREMENT aka. Restriction
Every veteran that has been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable MIGHT be eligible for VA memorial benefits.
PLAIN ENGLISH
If you were dishonorably discharged, you are disqualified from VA memorial benefits.
If you were not dishonorably discharged, the VA MIGHT have other ways to disqualify you.
INTERMENT BENEFITS
Interment benefits MIGHT include burial or inurnment in a national cemetery. If so, the burial plot, headstone, grave-liner, opening and closing and perpetual care would likewise be included. Please understand that these elements are only provided at a national cemetery.
If your veteran is interred at any other cemetery and meets the discharge requirement listed above, the VA MIGHT provide a governmental regulated headstone. Please recognize that although they MIGHT provide a headstone; they will not set the stone. You will still incur fees for the setting of the stone. You must also have someone willing to accept delivery of the stone. These stones are heavy and are generally delivered by a large semi truck. Once the stone has been accepted, one must also transport it to the cemetery at the appropriate time. Some stone setters will come by the delivery location and retrieve the stone. Be sure to ask your stone setter for this service but be prepared to pay for it. If you locate a stone setter prior to ordering the stone, you might ask if it can be delivered to the stone setter's place of work. That would be convenient for you.
Interestingly enough, the VA does not provide FINAL honors at a veteran’s funeral. Military honors are provided through the Department of Defense. Public Law 106-65 provides that every eligible veteran receive “final honors.” Please note that a veteran must qualify for these honors under the above-mentioned requirement. Final honors include the folding and presentation of a burial flag and the rendering of Taps. Although many expect it, 21 gun salutes are not included in the description of "final honors." In addition, ample time allowances are required when requesting this ceremony. Be prepared to hold your services in accordance with the honor guards schedule rather than your own.
Please note that interment benefits only apply to things that happen at the cemetery. They do not cover preparation of the veteran for burial or transportation of the veteran to the cemetery. These expenses are referred to as funeral expenses.
FUNERAL EXPENSE BENEFITS
A veteran’s family pays for all funeral expenses. If they are lucky, they MIGHT be reimbursed for a portion of them. These expenses include, but are not limited to, removal of remains, preparation of the body (embalming, casketing, dressing, disinfecting or cremating of remains), funeral arrangements (visitation, viewing, memorial, funeral or other ceremonies), funeral and burial merchandise (caskets, vaults, register books, funeral folders, acknowledgement cards, flowers, etc.) and privately, municipality or state owned cemetery property.
Service Related Death
BENEFIT: $2,000 toward burial expenses for deaths occurring on or after September 11, 2001.
RESTRICTIONS:

  • MUST have been discharged under condition other than dishonorable.
  • MUST have been involved in a military action at the moment of death.
  • MUST apply for the funds within two years of final disposition.
  • Non-Service Related Death
    BENEFIT: Up to $722 toward funeral expenses and $722 interment allowance for deaths occurring on or after October 1, 2012.
    RESTRICTIONS:

  • MUST have been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.
  • MUST apply for funds within two years of final disposition.

  • Oh, remember those other ways you MIGHT be disqualified mentioned under “PLAIN ENGLISH"?
  • PLAIN ENGLISH NON-SERVICE RELATED DEATH BENEFITS DISQUALIFIERS
    You are disqualified for these benefits if:

  • Your veteran was dishonorably discharged.
  • You fail to apply within two years of final disposition using VA Form 21-530.
  • You have received funds from another source, i.e. decedent’s employer or a state agency.
  • In addition to the aforementioned disqualifiers, your veteran MUST meet at least one of the following conditions to dodge disqualification from death benefits.

  • Your veteran MUST have died due to a service-related disability (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have been receiving a VA pension or VA compensation at the time of death (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have been entitled to receive a VA pension or VA compensation, but decided not to reduce his or her military retirement or disability pay (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have died in a VA hospital, or while receiving care under VA contract at a non-VA facility (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have died while traveling under proper authorization and at VA expense to or from a specified place for the purpose of examination, treatment or care (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have an original or reopened claim pending at time of death and would have been entitled to VA compensation or pension from a date prior to the date of death (OR)
  • Your veteran MUST have died on or after October 9, 1996, while a patient at a VA approved state nursing home.
  • Your application packet MUST include the following:

  • VA Form 21-530, Application for Burial Benefits
  • Proof of military service (DD 214)
  • Death Certificate
  • Copy of funeral bill
  • Copy of burial bill
  • The information for this article was obtained from experience as a military wife and funeral director, www.benefits.va.gov and VFW magazine. I hope this helps you understand how and who qualifies for VA burial benefits.
    My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and freelance writer. I write books, weekly articles and brief tips on understanding and coping with grief. It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
    Please follow my blog athttp://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement and information atwww.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

    Inmates at Funerals

    Living in a Tri-State area occasionally creates unique funeral situations for families with incarcerated members. The judicial system is not obligated, nor inclined, to accommodate familial loss. States in particular are not partial to allowing inmates to cross neither out of nor into their boundaries.
    If your family has suffered a loss and has a member who is currently incarcerated, you may be in luck of having them attend services if there has been a history of good behavior. Prisons in particular, like to reward good behavior and often will accommodate familial loss. Obstacles to overcome are boundaries, schedules and transportation.
    If your incarcerated loved one would like to attend the funeral, it is a good idea to contact the holding facility and ask for any specific requirements. Most likely they will require authentication of death; this can be acquired from your funeral director. They will also inform you of any scheduling issues that may conflict, so be sure to take note of dates and times of restriction. Some prisons have transportation funds, and some do not. If transportation is not within their budget, you will probably not enjoy the company of your inmate at the services. Accommodations are also a concern. If your inmate is too far away to attend the funeral as a day trip, again, you will probably not see them at the funeral.
    The major obstacle for inmate attendance however is boundaries. If your loved one passed in Texas and your prisoner is incarcerated in Arkansas, most likely, you will not see them if you schedule all of your services in Texas. Your funeral director, however, will be able to arrange your services so that your inmate will be able to attend at least a portion, assuming all other obstacles have been cleared. The solution requires family flexibility and cooperation.
    The determining factor of services will be the final resting place of the decedent. If your loved one died in Texas and will be buried in Arkansas, the answer is obvious. Arrange the visitation and funeral service in Texas to accommodate friends and family. Then arrange burial in Arkansas. Your inmate will not be required to cross state boundaries and as long as the travel distance is not too far, you will probably see him or her in attendance.
    If your loved one died in Texas and will be buried in Texas, you can arrange for your visitation and interment services to take place in Texas and your funeral services to take place in Arkansas. It has been my experience that inmates do not attend visitations, so do not expect to facilitate inmate attendance at this service. It seems the informality of this gathering lends to an unsecured environment and thereby nullifies the possibility of your inmate being there.
    These accommodations can be arranged no matter what two states are involved in the services. The big consideration however will be cost. You will probably sustain lower expenses if you utilize only one funeral home rather than two. Speak with your funeral director at length before finalizing any details and be sure to coordinate with the location of incarceration. If you will do this and your inmate has behaved well, you may be very pleasantly surprised with their attendance at one or more of the decedent’s services.
    My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences to "Make Life Right". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
    Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/, follow me on Twitter @PushnUpDaisies and visit my website for additional encouragement and information on booking speeches at www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com.

    Inmate Death

    When a loved one is incarcerated, his or her family expects that they will exit jail as they entered, alive. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Many questions arise when a loved one dies while incarcerated. Did they receive the protection they needed from other prisoners, or even from themselves? Was brutality, neglect or chaos contributory?  
    As a funeral director, I see the deaths of inmates pass through my funeral home. I also see the survivors. They search for reasons and speculate answers for the loss of their loved one. These survivors are often confused, as the details of death are generally not immediately available to them. Initially, there are many unanswered questions surrounding the death.
    Because the death occurred under police or guard protection, an investigation must take place to assure the prisoner’s rights were protected. Until this investigation is final, the cause of death will most likely be designated as pending. This pending certification may be very difficult for survivors to bear. Closure and grief work may be greatly hampered for them until, and after the cause of death is identified.
    In some cases, the cause of death really does not answer why their loved one died. For instance, if their loved one were found hanging from the rafters, the cause of death is obvious. The questions regarding the motivation of death however, remain unanswered. The survivors actually want to know, why their loved one was found hanging. Was it suicide or was it murder?
    Incarceration is difficult for any survivor to bear. An incarcerated death is unbelievably challenging for those left behind. Aside from the questions over cause of death, survivors may be unable to grieve their loss freely, due to shame. This type of death is classified as a non-loss or a socially unacceptable loss. The survivors must discover how to cope with their loss, along with the shame and embarrassment that accompany it. Not only are they grieving the loss of their loved one and coping with the shame of incarceration, they must also deal with any guilt they feel.
    Guilt may be motivated through several different scenarios. Survivors may feel guilt at not being able to protect their loved one from the harm that caused their death. If the loved one were suicidal, they probably did not know it. If they were uncomfortable with visiting their loved one in jail or prison, they may also feel neglectful. These are very sad and difficult contributors to guilt that may lead to depression among the survivors. This is a delicate time when survivors need to pull together, and be mindful of each other. Feelings of guilt, neglectfulness and depression put survivors in a greater risk category of suicide attempts.
    There is no quick or easy remedy for the pain and suffering survivors will endure in this situation. Pulling together for support and strength is critical for their recovery. If available, a copy of the investigative review may offer some answers. One should realize these findings might just as easily shed light on darker issues surrounding their loved ones death. Darker issues may increase the survivor’s feelings of guilt, pushing them closer toward depression or moving them nearer a dangerous state of despair.
    Survivors suffering the loss of an incarcerated loved one will endure a complex and dreadful grief experience. It is often wise to work with a professional counselor in this situation. Professionally licensed counselors are educationally prepared to know the issues that accompany this tragedy. Their training and experience equip them for prescribing positive methods to help guide survivors through substantially less complicated recovery processes.
    My name is Tracy Renee Lee. I am a funeral director, author and professional speaker. I write books and weekly bereavement articles related to understanding and coping with grief. I deliver powerful messages and motivate audiences to "Make Life Right before the Grim Reaper Calls". It is my life's work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on.
    Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book “Pushin’ Up Daisies” for additional encouragement and information.